Hala Stulecia

When I was in Wrocław for the very first time, I didn’t find enough time to see the Centennial Hall. I came back a few months later and even though my visit was focused rather on watching new films at the New Horizons film festival than sighseeing, I managed to go and see that famous UNESCO-listed venue.

The Centennial Hall was designed by a German architect Max Berg, who was an urban planner of Wrocław. It was built in 1913 in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of King Frederick William III’s proclamation to rise up against Napoleon’s occupation. At the time of construction it had world’s largest inner diameter of 65 m and organs. Later around this ferroconcrete venue a few another objects were built, including the arc-shaped pergola with a pond and multimedia fountain or the Four Domes Pavilion.

wrocław / poland

In 1948 the Iglica monument (96 m high) was set up in front of The Centennial Hall. It was constructed for the first exhibition after World War II, named ‘Regained Territories’. Originally, the Iglica had a spinning umbrella of mirrors on the top but it was struck by lightning before the opening day.

wrocław / poland

 

wrocław / poland

wrocław / poland

wrocław / poland

wrocław / poland

wrocław / poland wrocław / poland

The Arc-shaped pergola, 640 metres long, surrounding the pond with the multimedia fountain.

wrocław / poland wrocław / poland

Today the hall is still an active venue for sporting and music events. It’s not a spectacular building anymore but I recommend it as a must-see when visiting Wrocław. Inside the hall you can go the small interactive museum and explore the history of its construction. There is also a zoo park and the Japanese Garden nearby.

wrocław / poland